Oscar’s Fashion through the years

The biggest night in Hollywood is bringing together the biggest stars in beauty, fashion and style. The fashion comes and goes. Trends inspire and promote improvisations and boost creativity. Style doesn’t compromise. However, Oscar’s night breaks all the rules.

Want to see what the leading ladies were wearing through the years to the most glamorous party in LA? Here it is!

Tuna Cubes with Ginger “Inspiration”

Ingredients

 

Preparation

  1. Place tuna steaks in a casserole dish.
  2. In a bowl, mix the marinade ingredients: two tablespoons of ginger, garlic, soy sauce, two tablespoons of lime juice, and pour over the tuna.
  3. Marinate tuna in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours.
  4. Grill the tuna steaks for about 5–8 minutes if you like it medium.
  5. In a medium-size bowl, mix well the remaining ginger, lime juice, wasabi, parsley and chilli flakes.
  6. Cut tuna into even cubes and coat the pieces with ginger sauce. Serve with vegetables or white rice.

Oscars 2017 – The Winners List

Here is the complete list of 2017 Oscar winners and nominees

The winners of the 89th Academy Awards are being announced live from Hollywood now.

A quick recap: “La La Land” was the top nominee, notching a record-tying 14 nominations. “Moonlight” and “Arrival” followed with eight nods each.

Already, Mahershala Ali won for his role in ‘Moonlight.’ His win comes after back-to-back years in which  the academy did not recognize any nonwhite actors. This year, each of the four acting categories feature at least one nominee of color.

Here is the list of nominees:

Picture

Directing

  • Denis Villeneuve, “Arrival”
  • Mel Gibson, “Hacksaw Ridge” | Interview
  • Damien Chazelle, “La La Land” | Video
  • Barry Jenkins, “Moonlight” | Video | Interview
  • Kenneth Lonergan, “Manchester by the Sea” | Video

SEE THE COMPLETE LIST OF NOMINEES HERE >>

How to get rid of Mommy Guilt

The moment your new baby comes into your arms, a whole new set of emotions rushes in—pride, joy, wonderment, fear, and, yes, guilt. Because everything you do or don’t do as a guardian of this child is all your fault forevermore.

 That’s what it feels like anyway, sometimes, as a parent. Who hasn’t brushed off his or her kids (“Not now, son, I’m busy”) only to later regret that choice (even if at the moment you were working on finding world peace or writing an article on overcoming said guilt)? It’s most often called “mommy guilt” because we moms tend to berate ourselves—and be judged by others—for our child rearing, but fathers experience this guilt as well. It comes with the territory of being a parent.

The Many Ways We Can Feel Guilty as Parents

There are nearly infinite reasons for us to feel guilty. But just to give you an idea, here’s a short list:

  •  Mom’s milk might not be enough to breastfeed the child or mom decides not to breastfeed when everyone else is saying it’s best for the baby.

Originally this short list had about twice as many bullets, but you get the point. Pretty much anything that affects your kids is something you could feel guilty about, warranted or not.

Why We Feel Guilty

Some of these are the result of our own decisions or presence of mind, but it’s obvious that others are either beyond our control or no big deal in the large scheme of things. (Pajama day will come again.) But many of us hold ourselves to higher standards when it comes to parenting than perhaps any other endeavor. Here are my theories.

 First, everyone has an opinion on child rearing because we’ve all seen it in action for much of our lives. We’ve had a long time to consider what our parents did right or wrong when raising us, and so we have this idea of what we would and should do as parents—what being a “perfect” parent is like. Shuttling kids to and from activities with a smile, never raising your voice, preparing healthy meals your kids gobble up, never forgetting a PTA meeting (and actually going to them), and so on. It’s demanding, and it’s pretty much impossible to never fall short from the ideal or never feel guilty when we’re often torn in so many directions.

For many of us, parenthood is also a huge part of our identities, and anything that goes right or wrong can feel like a reflection of our efforts or abilities. Kid got straight A’s in school? Good job, Mom and Dad! Didn’t make the honor roll? Why didn’t you push them harder? Unlike many other pursuits, there are very high stakes when raising a child—a human being you could possibly scar for life (and who might blame you forever for it).

Other people don’t help either, from your kid reminding you of that time you gave him the most crooked haircut ever to the people in the restaurant or the airplane giving you dirty looks if your kid is crying or glued to the iPad. Don’t even get me started on other parents on the playground or in parenting forums.

http://lifehacker.com/how-to-get-rid-of-mommy-guilt-or-daddy-guilt-once-and-1679504610

Salad with Carrots and Figs “Sensuality”

Ingredients

 

Preparation

  1. Cut slices of carrot ribbons using vegetable peeler.
  2. Put the ribbons into icy cold water for 15 minutes to make them firmer.
  3. Drain the carrot ribbons and let them pat dry.
  4. To prepare dressing, combine olive oil, maple syrup, fresh cilantro, freshly squeezed lime juice and salt in a bowl.
  5. Mix together carrot ribbons, figs, walnuts and crumbled goat cheese. Add dressing before serving.

First Lady Style

The role of the first lady is not clearly defined under U.S. law, and each presidential spouse has charted her own course for the time she has lived at the White House. Inaugural festivities, including official balls featuring dancing, are a customary way the first lady makes her debut to the nation.

At the first inaugural ball in 1809, President James Madison’s wife, Dolley Madison, set a precedent by choosing American attire — a buff-colored velvet gown and pearl jewelry — instead of wearing diamonds like a queen.

“She purposely created an American wardrobe, an American style, that was appropriate” for her time and culture, which disdained royalty, said Jane Hampton Cook, an author and presidential historian.

Melania Trump, a former fashion model, is expected to make her own strong statement with fashion. The Slovenian-born Trump will be the second first lady to be born abroad, after London-born Louisa Adams, and is likely to bring art and glamour to the White House, Cook said.

“She is uniquely positioned because she is a former model, so she understands fashion very well and how to use it to create a certain image,” Cook said.

In her first formal appearance as First Lady, Melania Trump looked stunning in an off-the-shoulder Hervé Pierre gown. The former model collaborated with the designer on her bespoke ensemble for the Inaugural Ball on Friday evening.

The First Lady’s Inaugural Ball gown is always widely reported on and critiqued, and for good reason. It’s her first major style statement in her new role, and it often has significance behind it.

Michelle Obama’s gown in 2009, for example, was a pure white flowing Jason Wu dress, and was widely applauded for perfectly representing the platform of hope that her husband ran on. It has been called one of the most successful Inauguration gowns of all time.

Rosalynn Carter’s gown was much talked-about, too. She chose to re-wear a Mary Matise dress bought off the rack, one she’d worn twice before — including her husband’s inauguration as Governor of Georgia. The Carters were known to be frugal, and as many in the country were struggling financially that year, it was seen as a nod to the American people.

So how did other First Ladies make this ever-important first style statement? From Jackie Kennedy to Hillary Clinton, the fashion choices of these women have long carried significance. See below for the last 50 years of First Lady style.

Mamie Eisenhower, 1957

Mamie Eisenhower, 1957

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jacqueline Kennedy, 1961

Jacqueline Kennedy, 1961

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lady Bird Johnson, 1965

Lady Bird Johnson, 1965

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pat Nixon, 1969

Pat Nixon, 1969

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pat Nixon, 1973

Pat Nixon, 1973

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosalynn Smith Carter, 1977

Rosalynn Smith Carter, 1977

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nancy Reagan, 1981

Nancy Reagan, 1981

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nancy Reagan, 1985

Nancy Reagan, 1985

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barbara Bush, 1989

Barbara Bush, 1989

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hillary Clinton, 1993

Hillary Clinton, 1993

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hillary Clinton, 1997

Hillary Clinton, 1997

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laura Bush, 2001

Laura Bush, 2001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laura Bush, 2005

Laura Bush, 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michelle Obama, 2009

Michelle Obama, 2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michelle Obama, 2013

Michelle Obama, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Melania Trump, 2017

Melania Trump, 2017

How to teach a child to swim

Teaching kids to swim can be a fun yet daunting task for parents. There is much to consider when teaching a child to swim: age of the child, safety, and what aspect of swimming to teach first.

Even if you are not a huge fan of being in the water, you can successfully teach your child to swim and how to enjoy swimming safely. Below are tips of how to teach your child to swim.

  1. Splash Water

Teaching your child to splash in the pool will help him get used to the movement of the water. If he knows what to expect in the water he will be less afraid. Hold your child and move his legs to teach him to splash or kick. If you are going to dip your baby in the water, keep it short.

  1. Wet His Face

Blowing bubbles with your child can help him get used to the idea of getting his face wet, which can be an obstacle as he learns to swim. You can also sprinkle water on his head if he finds this amusing.

  1. Overcome Fear

Your child may be frightened of the water at first, so hold him securely by the armpits and move him into the water slowly. Walk around in the water together until he feels comfortable, while you should smile and show your child that you are enjoying the experience. Children are likely to learn to swim easily if they associate being in the water with pleasure.

  1. Float About

Show your child he can float naturally in the pool. Rest your child’s head on your shoulder and let his body float. This can be scary for your child at first so assure him that you will not let go and stop when your child is unwilling to continue, even if it only lasts a few seconds.

  1. Take a Plunge

If your child can hold his breath and likes to put his face in the water, try coaxing him into going underneath the water. This should be done gently as the pressure on his ears or nose can be unpleasant as first. Start by encouraging your child to submerge one side of his head and then the other. As he gets comfortable, move into the water. Hold your child’s nose for him at first until he can learn to regulate the movement into the water on his own.

  1. Play Water Games

As your child gets used to being in the water, start playing games together. Have your child chase toys in the shallow end of a pool, or hold your child on the belly to play “super hero.” You can also use floating objects like a kickboard to allow your child to race.

  1. Kick the Legs

Teaching your child to kick in the pool is one of the first steps in teaching him to swim. Have your child hold onto a kickboard and propel himself through the water. Once he has this skill down, your child can start to learn the strokes necessary during proper swimming lessons.

 

Strawberry Crumble “Sentimental”

 Ingredients

Preparation

  1. Put strawberries on the bottom of a dish, and sprinkle a little sugar.
  2. Put plain flour in a bowl, add butter, and rub it until it looks like breadcrumbs.
  3. Pour granulated sugar and oats into the mixture.
  4. Mix it up well, and pour it over the strawberries.
  5. Rough up the top with a fork and the sugar.
  6. Preheat the oven at 350 F (180C) and bake crumble for about 30 minutes.
  7. Serve it hot with a scoop of ice cream.

Turkey and Broccoli Casserole “Sexy Time”

 Ingredients

 

Preparation

  1. In a large skillet cook turkey with oregano, rosemary, fennel and onions at the medium temperature for about 10 minutes.
  2. Whisk together eggs and mayonnaise.
  3. Mix turkey with broccoli, cheese, and eggs.
  4. Place the mixture in a greased casserole. Bake at 350° F (180° C) for 20-25 minutes.

What can you borrow from the boys?

I have spotted on one of my friend amazing velvet jacket the other day. She told me, she found that vintage Dolce piece in her husband’s wardrobe. She simply tailored it and now its her favourite jacket this winter.

I have “borrowed” from my husband a few accessories over the years: belts, watches, ties. Or and I also tailored one a sweatshirt. So, it made me wonder, what women can learn from menswear? Great acrtilce by Refinery29 says it all: “Borrowing from the boys is one of those fashion clichés we’ve never quite understood. Striped tees, destroyed denim, sneakers — isn’t that the way most women dress when we’re not meeting foreign dignitaries?

But, having wardrobes full of unisex pieces doesn’t mean men and women think about fashion in the same way. Ever hear a guy wax poetic about the minutiae of stitching and button placement between a Levi’s Type I and Type II jacket? Or, have you wondered why it seems so much easier for them to get dressed in the morning. Without being too essentialist about it, adopting a dude-like approach to fashion can lead ladies to some pretty major clothing revelations. We spoke with some of our favorite style experts, from the man behind Madewell’s perfectly tomboy-chic designs to Details‘ style director, to a woman who makes bespoke suits for ladies.

We found out their secrets to simplifying and editing their wardrobes, and how to make maximum impact with a minimum number of pieces. It’s not about being one of the guys (unless you want to be). It’s about using a menswear sensibility to make sure your style is perfectly tailored for you”.